Stravinsky - Petrushka : Ernest Ansermet : L'Orchestre De La Suisse Romande - 180g LP


Stravinsky - Petrushka : Ernest Ansermet : L'Orchestre De La Suisse Romande - 180g LP

Product no.: SXL 2011

In stock

Stravinsky - Petrushka : Ernest Ansermet : L'Orchestre De La Suisse Romande - 180g LP
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Speakers Corner / Decca SXL 2011 - 180 Gram Virgin Vinyl - 

Limited Edition - Pure Analogue Audiophile Mastering - Pressed  at Pallas Germany

180 Gram Vinyl -  TAS Audiophile Demo Disc 

Ansermet's orchestra sounds fantastic in their home Victoria Hall. Known for its wonderful acoustics, the recording is well nigh flawless -- powerful and delicate as need be. Both macro and micro dynamics are stunning on this LP.  Whether in Petrushka's room or the Moor's, Ansermet wrings every bit of colour and character provided by Stravinsky. I know most recordings of one of my favourite pieces of music. Many are better played, none better recorded. And none better in characterization.  The recording captures the pp percussion exquisitely. Listen to the low woodwinds' Moorish melody with its accompanying percussion --cymbals and bass drum. The quiet percussion is so accurate. Loud brass, too, when things start going pear-shaped and the Moor fights and 'kills' Petrushka. Audiophila Review

L'Orchestre De La Suisse Romande. Ernest Ansermet (conductor). Stravinsky initially conceived the music for Petrushka as a kind of burlesque combat between the piano and orchestra. The piano was to play the role of the puppet that exasperated the orchestra with its diabolical sequences. The accompanying orchestra was to retaliate in force leading finally to a climax in which the puppet collapses. This performance of Stravinsky's Petrushka was recorded at Victoria Hall in Geneva in the fall of 1957.

Musicians:
L'Orchestre de la Suisse Romande
Ernest Ansermet, conductor

Stravinsky initially conceived the music for Petrushka as a kind of burlesque combat between the piano and orchestra. The piano was to play the role of the puppet that exasperated the orchestra with its diabolical sequences. The accompanying orchestra was to retaliate in force leading finally to a climax in which the puppet collapses. The music that ultimately emerged elaborated a story of puppets that were actually more human than their puppetmaster ever imagined. Although the primitive rhythms and kaleidoscopic colors initially gave the conductor and ballet troupe difficulty, the work was premiered June 13, 1911.

Although Pierre Monteux conducted the premiere, Ernest Ansermet has always been closely associated with Stravinsky's music. He was among Stravinsky's circle of friends in Paris prior to World War I and first played excerpts from Petrushka in Geneva on January 12, 1915. This performance of Stravinsky's Petrushka was recorded at Victoria Hall in Geneva between October and November of 1957.

The Decca engineers, led by Roy Wallace, set up a tree with three Neumann KM-56 microphones. The signal was routed through a three-channel vacuum tube mixer, without noise processing or gain riding, to an Ampex stereo vacuum tube recorder.



Selections:
Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971)
Petrushka

1. 1st Tableau: The Shrovetide Fair
2. 2nd Tableau: In Petrushka's Room
3. 3rd Tableau: In the Moor's Room
4. 4th Tableau: The Shrovetide Fair (Evening)

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