Vivaldi - Concertos : Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra conducted by Ariadne Daskalakis - 180g LP


Vivaldi - Concertos : Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra conducted by Ariadne Daskalakis - 180g LP

Product no.: L205

In stock

Vivaldi - Concertos : Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra conducted by Ariadne Daskalakis - 180g LP
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Tacet -  L205 - 180 Gram Virgin Vinyl - AAA 100% Analogue  

Analogue Recording Pure Audiophile - Half Speed Mastering  

Pressed at Pallas Germany - Limited Edition

 
Tacet’s new recording of Vivaldi concertos is as fine an example of the vinyl medium as I’ve spun on my turntable this century. The music is interesting and delightful, the performances are top-shelf, and the sonics are the kind audiophiles truly appreciate: A wide soundstage offers easily identified instruments, delivering a crisp dynamic performance. Exquisite yet creamy highs and rich harmonics abound across a clear and direct presentation in a naturally (but not overly) reverberant church. We don’t usually think of Vivaldi’s works as showcase compositions, but if you like Baroque music, this collection is as good as it gets
 Antonio Vivaldi: - Sound 5/5 Music 5/5 The Audio Beat
 
Concerto for Two Violins, RV 522
Concerto for Two Cellos, RV 531
Concerto for Three Violins, RV 551
Concerto for Violin and Cello, RV 547
 
After years of neglect, Vivaldi’s works were resurrected in the 20th century, thanks largely to the efforts of Alfredo Casella, and more of his music continues to be rediscovered. by German label TACET.
 
Founded by Karl Münchinger in 1945, this outstanding orchestra plays on modern instruments but pays due regard to authentic performing style. Asked to describe her impressions when hearing the multi-channel version for the first time, Ariadne Daskalakis named three things: she could hear herself better than ever before on a recording, she detected far more interaction between the musicians and she was able to recognise all the details of the score.
 
With each member of the orchestra playing a solo as the Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra, conducted here by guest concertmistress Ariadne Daskalakis, take on the roles of the orphan girls taught by Vivaldi.
 
Vivaldi’s music has never sounded more vibrant.
 
Personnel: Sloists and the Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra conducted by Ariadne Daskalakis
 
Recording: 2012 at Evangelical Church Reutlingen-Gönningen, Germany, by Andreas Spreer
 
Production: Andreas Spreer
 
var. soloists and the Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra conducted by Ariadne Daskalakis
 
Musicians
Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Ariadne Daskalakis, conductor

Selections:
Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741)
Concerto for 2 Violins and Orchestra in A minor

1. Allegro
2. Larghetto e spiritoso
3. Allegro
Concerto for 2 Violincellos and Orchestra in G minor
4. Allegro
5. Largo
6. Allegro
Concerto for 3 Violins and Orchestra in F Major
7. Allegro
8. Andante
9. Allegro
Concerto for Violin, Violoncello and Orchestra in B flat Major
10. Allegro (moderato)
11. Andante
12. Allegro molto

Total paying time, 38:36

Recording: 2012 at Evangelical Church Reutlingen-Gönningen, Germany, by Andreas Spreer
 
Inspiring Tube Sound:
What is it that makes "tube sound" what it is? The advantages of tubes over transistors are difficult to describe in technical terms. Perhaps the reference to the higher and different type of distortion with tube amplifiers is most applicable, although "distortion" has a rather negative meaning: the more distortion, the worse it is. So this can't be entirely right. Besides, the distortions of these microphones of 1947 are much too slight to be really noticeable. The recording of the Partitas of Johann Sebastian Bach with Florin Paul is, for me, although meanwhile almost 23 years old, still the best example in our TACET catalogue of the special quality of tube microphones. The two U 47 microphones by Neumann made their contribution. 
 
For the LP, however, (except for rare exceptions, justified for musical reasons) the signal is even stored on a tube tape recorder and then mastered with valve equipment, so that one would be right in saying that for the entire production not a single transistor was used. 
 
We have always been especially pleased to receive so much feedback about our Tube Only productions. This motivates us even more to keep working with this technology and rescue it from oblivion. People have told us that the music sounds warmer, without losing any of its TACET brilliance. The timbres glow more. We have also heard that people have the impression of a more homogeneous sound, whatever that is meant to be. So let everyone listen to their own hearts and to the Tube Only recordings and feel something special! Even the sheer joy of this slightly nostalgic outstanding technology can be reason enough to like these productions. Yet what would it all be without the wonderful work of the artists! 
 
 
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