Beethoven - Violin Concerto in D Major , Op.61 : David Oistrakh : André Cluytens - 180g LP


Beethoven - Violin Concerto in D Major , Op.61 : David Oistrakh : André Cluytens - 180g LP

Product no.: SAX2315

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Beethoven - Violin Concerto in D Major , Op.61 : David Oistrakh : André Cluytens - 180g LP
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AAA 100% Analogue This LP was Remastered using Pure Analogue Components Only from the Master Tapes through to the Cutting Head

EMI Testament - SAX2315  - 180 Gram Virgin Vinyl -AAA 100% Analogue

Mastered at Abbey Road - Pressed at Optimal in Germany

Limited Edition - Emi Columbia SAX 2315

Testament has revived these classic titles from the EMI catalog using only the original EMI master tapes,cut onto lacquer at EMI's Abbey Road Studios and mastered using full analog techniques throughout production.

BEETHOVEN Violin Concerto in D, Op.61 David Oistrakh Orchestre National de France André Cluytens Recorded in STEREO

"1806 was the year after the composition of Fidelio, the year of its first revision, and the year in which Beethoven wrote three sunny masterpieces, the serenest and most loving of which is certainly this violin concerto. He dedicated it, not to the co-operative lady friend of the movement, but to his boyhood friend Stephan von Breuning, a character who emerges more finely from the tale of Beethoven's life than any of his other friends.
 
"The concerto was written for Franz Clement who, at 26, was conductor and leader (two more or less synonymous posts, since baton-waving was not invented) of the famous Theater an der Wien. The concerto was written quickly, but only just completed in time for the first performance on 23 December; Clement is said to have sight-read his part, but this is not too stunning a feat, since he had been advising Beethoven on the layout of the solo, and may even have influenced the nature of the Rondo theme. At the premiere Clement played the new work in two parts, the Larghetto being preceded by an interval and a group of solos - one of these was a sonata for one-stringed fiddle played upside down. Czerny was mightily impressed by Clement's performance, but the concerto was thought insignificant until Joseph Joachim popularized it later in the century. Concert-goers of a past generation speak with reverent phrases of his interpretation, and claim it has never been equaled since; for younger folk the Beethoven violin concerto means Fritz Kreisler, and it is curious that he excelled in just those passages singled out by Joachim's eulogists, the G minor passage in the middle of the first movement, and the deathly hushed second tune of the Larghetto.
 
"Both these great players have left fine sets of cadenzas to the concerto. David Oistrakh plays those by Kreisler on the present record. The cadenzas by Beethoven to the concerto were designed for the adaptation as a piano concerto which he made in 1807, and dedicated to von Breuning's wife. The first movement cadenza was scored for piano and obbligato drums - it has been transcribed in our own time for violin and drums by Max Rostal." - from liner notes by William Mann
 
"David Oistrakh's strong, aristocratic reading on HMV Concert Classics is a fine one. The EMI recording is undoubtedly superior, with a spacious acoustic and warm, resonant orchestral tone. The reading is characteristically assured, the soloists's phrasing and sense of line impeccable." — Penguin Record Guide.
 
Here is a chance to hear the artistry of David Oistrakh in good sound. This record has long been a favorite of mine. I have it in a commercial LP re-issue (English pressing). The Testament re-issue works wonders for the orchestral accompaniment, transforming it from rather bright and unpleasant to warm and atmospheric.
 
The wonder of Oistrakh's playing is his huge, golden tone. The notes truly pour off his violin like honey. More importantly he devoted his abundant technical skills to musical expression rather than to mere showmanship. This concerto is, of course, conceived to showcase the violinist and Oistrakh certainly brings off that aspect of the piece. However, he also turns in a committed, passionate performance of great expression. There is wonderful phrasing and intonation throughout. - EnjoytheMusic Review 
 
Beethoven - Violin Concerto in D Major, Op.61
David Oistrakh
French National Radio Orchestra conducted by André Cluytens
 
SIDE 1
First Movement: Allegro ma non troppo - Cadenza (by Kreisler) - Tempo I
 
SIDE 2
Second Movement: Larghetto, leading to:-
Third Movement: Rondo (Allegro - Cadenza (by Kreisler) - Tempo I)
 
Recording first published 1959
 
Beethoven\u0020\u002D\u0020Violin\u0020Concerto\u0020in\u0020D\u0020Major\u0020\u002C\u0020Op\u002E61\u0020\u003A\u0020David\u0020Oistrakh\u0020\u003A\u0020André\u0020Cluytens\u0020\u002D\u0020180g\u0020LP
 
 
 
Testament Records

Testament has revived these classic titles from the EMI catalog using only the original EMI master tapes, cut onto lacquer at EMI's Abbey Road Studios and mastered using full analog techniques throughout production.
 

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