Dinah Washington - Back To the Blues - 180g LP


Dinah Washington - Back To the Blues - 180g LP

Product no.: PPANSR25189

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Dinah Washington - Back To the Blues - 180g LP
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Pure Pleasure - PPAN SR25189 - 180 Gram Virgin Vinyl 

AAA 100% Analogue  - Mastered by Ray Staff at Air London

Limited Edition - Pressed  at Pallas Germany - SR25189 Roulette

AAA 100% Analogue This  LP was Remastered using Pure Analogue Components Only, from the Master Tapes through to the Cutting Head

The boutique audiophile label PurePleasure, out of England, has recently re-released this album on 180 gm vinyl remastered by their ace engineer, Ray Staff. The acoustics are more than adequate for the time period, and the stereo separation brings no complaints. This LP provides a proper finish to Washington’s career as her voice remained strong to the end. She brings a snap and vibrancy to the material with her distinctive high pitched vocals. At her best, she clearly compares to Sarah Vaughan, for gritty take-no-prisoners persona Sound 4/5 Audiophile Audition

Dinah Washington performs music arranged and conducted by Fred Norman, including "The Blues Ain't Nothin' But A Woman Cryin' For Her Man'.

"During the 1950s she had been regarded as an R&B performer but arranger and band-leader Fred Norman wrote these fine 1962 jazz settings for her shortly before her death. The material is strong and Washington soars and swings, her voice reaching many of the potent climaxes for which she was so highly regarded..." - Steve Voce

"Prior to her 1959 hit "What a Difference a Day Makes," nearly every Dinah Washington recording (no matter what the style) was of interest to jazz listeners. However, after her unexpected success on the pop charts, most of Washington's sessions for Mercury and Roulette during the last four years of her life were quite commercial, with string arrangements better suited to country singers and Washington nearly parodying herself with exaggerated gestures. Fortunately, this 1963 LP is an exception, a blues-oriented collection that features Washington returning to her roots, backed by a jazz-oriented big band (with occasional strings and background voices). Eddie Chamblee and Illinois Jacquet have some tenor solos, guitarist Billy Butler is heard from, and the trumpet soloist is probably Joe Newman. In general, this is a more successful date than Washington's earlier investigation of Bessie Smith material, since the backup band is more sympathetic and the talented singer is heard in prime form. Dinah Washington clearly had a real feeling for this bluesy material." - AMG

Although she was one of the most powerful and moving of the jazz singers, Dinah Washington suffered more than most from unimaginative and erratic backings. Many of her EmArcy recordings, notably those with Clifford Brown or Clark Terry on trumpet, had outstanding performances, but her collections were compromised by unsuitable accompaniment. This set of 12 blues gives a lop-sided picture in that it doesn't include any of her ballad performances. However, the basic big band settings allow the power and verve of her singing to come through, and confirm her as the best of the women singers with blues material. During the 1950s she had been regarded as an R&B performer but arranger and band-leader Fred Norman wrote these fine 1962 jazz settings for her shortly before her death. The material is strong and Washington soars and swings, her voice reaching many of the potent climaxes for which she was so highly regarded. The material runs through much of the traditional repertoire--Big Bill Broonzy, Leroy Carr and Lil Green being represented--and there is a nine-minute "Nobody Knows The Way I Feel This Morning" that is unique in her discography. --Steve Voce

Towards the end of her career, songstress Dinah Washington was panned by some critics for recording weak pop music with overly commercial string backing. Washington’s inimitable voice overcame these limitations but her reputation still suffered.

Recorded a little over a year before her tragic death at age 39, Dinah returned to her blues roots, backed by a sympathetic big band led by Fred Norman, on Back to the Blues. She was clearly back in her element and the strings and background voices do not distract from her presentation. The choice of material is largely traditional.

The boutique audiophile label PurePleasure, out of England, has recently re-released this album on 180 gm vinyl remastered by their ace engineer, Ray Staff. The acoustics are more than adequate for the time period, and the stereo separation brings no complaints. This LP provides a proper finish to Washington’s career as her voice remained strong to the end. She brings a snap and vibrancy to the material with her distinctive high pitched vocals. At her best, she clearly compares to Sarah Vaughan, for gritty take-no-prisoners persona.

“It’s a Mean Old Man’s World” is right up her alley and features a soulful tenor sax solo. The big band takes an upfront posture on “Key to the Highway” and Dinah is matched with a male gospel-like chorus. Billy Butler’s guitar solo highlights “The Blues Ain’t Nothin’ But a Woman Cryin’ for Her Man.”

The use of strings comes on a bit strong on “No Hard Feelings” and takes away from Dinah’s vocals. When Washington belts out the graveyard would be the place my man lies on “Nobody Knows the Way I Feel This Morning,” it is clear that this is a not a woman to mess with.

When she passed away in mid-December 1963, from an unexpected overdose of diet pills with alcohol, the jazz world lost a distinctive voice who was at home singing most any kind of music, but with a clear mastery of jazz and rhythm and blues. Her blues bonafides are on display on this release.

• Re-mastering by Ray Staff at Air Mastering at Air Mastering, Lyndhurst Hall, London

Musicians:

Dinah Washington, vocals
Fred Norman, arranger, conductor
Illinois Jacquet, tenor saxophone
Eddie Chamblee, tenor saxophone
Jack Wilson, piano
Patti Bown, piano
Jimmy Sigler, organ
Everett Barksdale, guitar
Billy Butler, guitar
George Duvivier, bass
Jimmy Thomas, drums
Osie Johnson, drums

Produced by Henry Glover

Recorded at Bell Sound Studios, New York, March - November 1962
 
Selections:

Side A:
1. The Blues Ain't Nothin' But A Woman Cryin' For Her Man
2. Romance In the Dark
3. You've Been A Good Old Wagon
4. Let Me Be the First To Know
5. How Long, How Long blues
6. Don't Come Running Back To Me
Side B:
1. It's A Mean Old Man's World
2. Key To the Highway
3. If I Never Get To Heaven
4. Duck Before You Drown
5. No Hard Feelings
6. Nobody Knows the Way I Feel This Morning

Recorded July and November 1962

Dinah Washington - Back To the Blues 180g LP

 
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Pure Pleasure Records
The Restoration of the Art of Sound
180g Vinyl Mastered From The Best Available Sources

At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records. During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s – or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.

A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.

We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production. To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

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Its tangible, you can feel it, see it, study it,   muse/dream over it, it’s real, someone  has spent hours and hours over its construction and presentation. Pure Pleasure Records is just that, Pure Pleasure and that is what it has set out to be.  

The music and the physical record.  Something to keep, treasure, admire and above all enjoy.Of course with vinyl it’s not just a record, it’s the cover,  the sleeve notes, you are  holding a unique package, produced by craftsmen.

Pure Pleasure  Records bring you vinyl albums of quality Jazz - Blues - R+B - Soul - Funk, remastered by some of the best engineers in the world and pressed on 180 gram audiophile vinyl at what is probably the best pressing plant in Europe 

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PALLAS
Audiophile Vinyl - Made in Germany  For over 60 years the family business in the third generation of the special personal service and quality "Made by Pallas" is known worldwide. Our custom PVC formulation produces consistently high pressing quality with the lowest surface noise in the industry. Our PVC complies with 2015 European environmental standards and does not contain toxic materials such as Lead, Cadmium or Toluene. Our vinyl is both audiophile and eco-grade!  
 

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